WFU Class

This Spring (2013), I am (remotely) teaching a graduate course through Wake Forest University’s Department of Communication with Dr. Joseph Packer. The course is designed to prepare students who are interested in teaching debate in China.

Course Goals: (1) Students will develop an understanding of the design and purpose(s) of the debate education in China and Dipont’s program; (2) Students will develop an understanding of the education and communication theory that grounds the practice of debate in China and the program; (3) Students will assess (elements of) the program based on an academically sound methodology; (4) Students will have the option of producing at least one publication based on the study.

Grading:

40% — Final project
20% — Class discussion in forums — This is our way of making sure you are keeping up with the readings and videos.
20% — Development of a lesson for use in China (lesson plan, PP, content)
20% — Working with Chinese debate students via the internet

We will cover the following topics in the following weeks. Additional materials for the later weeks will be provided soon.

1-(February 4th) Dipont Education Management and the China debate program

Readings:  (1) Bauschard, S.  Conference presentation on the China debate program; (2) Why are the Chinese flocking to US Colleges;  (3) About Dipont; (4) Dipont Schools and Centers;   (5) NFL History; (6) NFL Honor Society;  (7) Leading English Language Schools Join NFL

Video: Company promotional video;  Highlights of tournament #1

Photos: China PF Tournament #1; Chinese students @ Harvard Debate Workshop 

Debate class #1; Debate class #2; Shanghai business district; China debate promotion tour (December 2011)

Assignment: You should complete the readings, look at the pictures and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by February 10th.

2 (February 11th)-The core curriculum, instructional supports, English language schools, and English education in China

Readings:  Common Core English Language Arts Standards; 21st Century Skills Standards; International Baccalaureate Standards; China-CurricularFrameworkOutline

Battle for $2 Billion English Language Teaching Market in China; David Block — English as a “global language” in China: An investigation into learners’ and teachers’ language beliefs (also available in Drop Box); From Context to Curriculum: A Case Study of Communicative Language Teaching in China;

Becker, C. B. (1986). Reasons for the lack of argumentation and debate in the Far East. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 10(1), 75-92. (also available in Drop Box)

Assignment: You should complete the readings, by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by February 17th.

Questions

(1) In “Reasons for the lack of argumentation and debate in the Far East,” Becker suggests that there is a “deep-seated Sino-Japanese prejudice” against discussion and debate.   After reading the article, and thinking about what you have learned to date, identify some weaknesses in Becker’s argument.

(2) Identify some strengths in Becker’s argument and how you might be able to account for them and overcome them as a teacher.

(3) Articulate some thoughts on how the China’s growing interest in learning English and English language instruction will start to impact how argumentation and debate functions in China.

(4) Identify four Common Core English Language Arts standards and explain how they are similar to at least one 21st Century Learning Skills standard and at least one International Baccalaureate standard.

(5) If you could re-organize the China Curriculum document, how might you do it?

(6) How do the English Language Arts, the 21st Century Learning Skills, and the International Baccalaureate standards support China’s efforts to develop a Western education curriculum?

(7) Pick on other reading in the bibliography on Chinese communication styles that is in the Drop Box and explain how what you learned from the reading can help you as a teacher in China.

 

3 (February 18th) -Public Forum debate fundamentals & developing a study

Readings: Public Forum Basics (in Drop Box)

Assignments:  TBD literature reviews to support the study, choosing a methodology (lit review to support the methodology).

Video: Public Forum Debate Demo

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by February 17th. You should respond to the discussion questions by February 10th. You should decide on what your final project will be and begin work on the project, at least the literature review.

4 (February 24) -Argumentation and public speaking: Core Skills

Readings: Rybold NCA paper (in Drop Box); On Training of Public Speaking in English; Blended learning using video-based blogs: Public speaking for English as a second language students

; Localization of the Public Speaking Course in China’s EFL Curriculum

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week. .

5 (March 4) Contemporary secondary educational methods

Curriculum reform and ‘Quality Education’ in China: An overview
(also available in Drop Box)

Ellili-Cherif, Maha; Romanowski, Michael H.; Nasser, Ramzi. All that glitters is not gold: challenges of teacher and school leader licensure licensing system in Qatar. In: International Journal of Educational Development, 2012, vol.32, n�3, p. 471-481 (Drop Box)

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by March 10th. You should respond to the discussion questions by March 18th. You should continue to work on your final project.

Review questions:

-Note — all of the review questions are now posted in Sakai. Please answer them there.

(1) Della-Ivaco discusses some barriers to curriculum reform in China.  Explain how these barriers apply to the development of debate.  What are some ways they can be overcome?

(2) How can you expect some teachers and administrators in China’s schools to react to debate? How will you address their concerns?

(3) What do you think of Ellili-Cheri’s criticism of Western educational methods as being grounded in ne0-liberalism? Is this a reason to oppose the promotion of debate?

6 (March 11)-Managing a large debate team and other popular debate events.

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by March 17th. You should respond to the discussion questions by March 18th. You should continue to work on your final project.

7 (March 18)-Teaching Chinese students in China

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by March 24th. You should respond to the discussion questions by March 25th. You should continue to work on your final project.

8 (March 25th)-Beyond tournaments: Related classroom activities

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by April 6th. You should respond to the discussion questions by March April 7th. You should continue to work on your final project.

9  (April 8th) -Comprehensive curriculum review

Assignment: You should complete the readings and watch the video by the end of the week.  You should respond to the discussion questions by April 14th. You should respond to the discussion questions by April 14th. You should continue to work on your final project.

10 (April 15th)-Review & final (project)

All course work must be completed by April 30th.

Supplemental/Optional Readings

Globish: How English Became the World’s Language

The course will be offered as a 3 hour graduate course.

Two years of work experience or a Master’s degree are usually required to obtain a work visa in China, but exceptions can be made for well qualified candidates.

To take the class, Comm 670-Teaching and Directing High School Debate, one needs to apply to the Wake Graduate School as an unclassified student (http://graduate.wfu.edu/). The application fee is waived.  The cost for the course is $1,181 per hour – 3 hours = $3,543, but scholarships of $1763.00 will be applied to the tuition charge (cost ½ tuition). One would need to apply on line at Apply online and provide a college or Graduate program transcript. Letters are not needed for this class.

Those applying should upload a Personal Statement indicating that they are applying for the COM 670 online course.

The course is designed for those who have completed an undergraduate degree, are near completion of an undergraduate degree, completed or finishing up a Master Degree.  The course is open to Wake Forest students and students outside the university.